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It seems fitting that on the 4 July as America celebrates the declaration of independence from British rule we acknowledge the contribution made by the proliferation of independent businesses. Power, ownership and control are the hallmarks of an institutionalised world and this is particularly evident within an industrialised economy.

Amidst a rapidly changing landscape buoyed largely by technological advances and the global gateway we now know as the internet, the playground for real transformational change both at a personal level and a business level is the micro economy. As the nature of work becomes more transient and itinerant larger numbers, by necessity or choice, are opting out of the mainstream and into the world of freelance, self-employment and enterprise.

The digital and knowledge economies give the people a voice. Social media and viral marketing channels allow us to communicate in real time across the globe. Whilst there remains a healthy cynicism about the influence of big brother we have access to a wider range of non-mainstream information channels.

The raison d’etre of independent business owners differs at its core to large public companies and corporate institutions. The strongest catalyst for Independent business owners going out on their own in pursuit of their dreams is not primarily for wealth creation but rather lifestyle choice. The most discernible difference between the economic drivers of big business and small business is not the pursuit of profit but rather the MAXIMISATION of profit.

Entrepreneurship, at its core, is the place where materiality and spirituality meet. A heartfelt mission or passion fuels the drive to do what you love, make a purposeful contribution and leave an enduring legacy. It’s essence is creative. It is an invitation to create value. Sure, an institutionalised world offers employment opportunities and many of these are built around compliance and regulatory activities.

The heart of the entrepreneurial world beats as a conscious, creative collective and in large measure this is due to those that took a risk to pursue their dreams – in much the same way as our forefathers before us. So, today on Independents Day we salute those brave entrepreneurs who dared to dream and dared to pursue their dreams. Long may you prosper.



by Dennis Roberts


Have we met before? If this is your first time reading my posts, thanks for stopping by. If you liked what you read, FOLLOW ME here. I write blogs/ articles on a range of topics including career coaching, entrepreneurship, business and leadership. All my writing is infused with a daily dose of consciousness. Please feel free to share my message with your own social network.



 
 
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by Deepak Chopra

In almost every situation someone is called upon to lead. Taking up the call involves a conscious choice, and yet for many leaders, even those who are very experienced, not much consciousness is applied. If you ask a roomful of CEOs how they got where they are today -I've done this dozens of times when teaching a course on leadership for business people - the top answer is always "I was lucky." Looking back, CEOs and other top executives mainly recognize that they wound up in the right place at the right time.

There are courses in leadership everywhere, and most of them, so far as I can tell, use case studies. The performance of successful leaders is analyzed, with comparisons to less successful leaders. These courses no doubt produce a set of skills, but the tendency is for these skills to be technical and managerial - human skills are far harder to teach and pass on. Yet they are the key to persuading other people to follow you.

I've taken a different tack, arguing that leadership is all about consciousness. It has to be, since the response that a great leader inspires (loyalty, respect, emulation, love) is life-changing. Such responses are not evoked by well-trained managers. Skills can be developed in consciousness. This isn't a mystical area, although we must go beyond practical psychology. A successful leader isn't a psychological manipulator, power grabber, bully, or public relations hack. Success, as it is practiced consciously, brings a better life, inner and outer, to both the leader and the group he leads.



3 Secrets of Charisma! Why Bill Clinton is a charismatic leader

Courtesy of The Chopra Foundation

We'll focus on seven skills that fit a conscious leader, organized into the acronymsLEADERS. Below is a thumbnail sketch of these skills, which will be discussed one by one in the next seven posts.

L = Look and listen. Do this with your senses, being an unbiased observer who has not judged anything in advance. Do this with your heart, obeying your truest feelings. Finally, do this with your soul, responding with vision and deep purpose.

E = Emotional bonding. Leading from the soul means going beyond melodrama and crisis mode, getting rid of emotional toxicity to understand the specific needs of your followers.

A = Awareness. This means being aware of the following questions that underlie every challenge: Who am I? What do I want? What does the situation demand? A leader must ask these questions of himself and inspire his team to ask for themselves.

D = Doing. A leader must be action-oriented. In whatever he does he must serve as a role model, held responsible for the promises he has made. This requires persistence but also the ability to view any situation with flexibility and humor.

E = Empowerment. The soul’s power comes from self-awareness, which is responsive to feedback but independent of the good or bad opinion of others. Empowerment isn’t selfish. It raises the status of leader and follower together.

R = Responsibility. This means showing initiative, taking mature risks rather than reckless ones, walking the talk, having integrity, and living up to your inner values. Seen from the level of the soul, a leader’s greatest responsibility is to lead the group on the path of higher consciousness.

S = Synchronicity. This is a mysterious ingredient from the unconscious that all great leaders harness. Synchronicity is the ability to create good luck and find invisible support that carries a leader beyond predicted outcomes to a higher plane. In spiritual terms, synchronicity is the ultimate ability to connect any need with an answer from the soul.


 
 
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by Dennis Roberts

Amid the confusion of coaching and mentoring there a basic question that might be asked and it is this, “Whose lesson are you learning?” Most clients I come across don’t draw a distinction between the two fields and quite frankly most don’t really care if there is a difference. That said I have been on both the coaching and mentoring panels of one organisation and I’ll share this with you - mentors often get paid more.

The argument put forward by mentoring groups is that you must have a pool of experience, generally senior executive experience, and lots of it. Largely considered the domain of greybeards it is possible the last bastion of the old boys club.  When you engage a mentor the expectation is that you are paying for their experience. And there may be substantial economic value in that aforesaid experience. Now ask the question!

“Whose lesson am I learning?”

The real value of having a mentor is that you learn YOUR lesson. It has nothing to do with you learning the mentor’s lesson unless there is some transfer of knowledge that benefits you. Otherwise you would just as well be served talking with your grandfather.

Mentors can give you a perspective on life’s events that maybe outside your current paradigm of thinking. That is a knowledge transfer. Valuable. 

Mentors can give you lessons and insights into how to navigate your way through a tough situation like a recession. It will only be relevant to the extent that there is something transferable. Learning how tough your grandfather had it during the Great Depression may give insight into his character but may not give you clues as to whether to lay off staff, cut costs or refinance your business.

Coaching v Mentoring

The best description I ever heard of the differences in modalities is that a coach is someone you learn WITH whereas a mentor is someone you learn FROM.

One of the most clichéd examples is of sporting coaches. Many sporting teams still subscribe to the belief that you engage a coach who knows how to play the game. I don’t subscribe to this view. In much the same way a top gun sales person doesn’t necessarily make a good national sales manager, a successful player doesn’t necessarily make a great coach. They are very different skill sets.

The growing popularity of sports science now adds considerable weight to this argument.

Who has the intellectual property?

There is a distinction that needs to be made between a business proprietor and an entrepreneur. At the heart of it an entrepreneur comes up with the big idea and the vision for the business. The much vaunted entrepreneurial spirit is literally the seeding of an idea. From nothing arises something.

A growing number of businesses are franchise business systems. The conception of the idea, the entrepreneurial spirit, the spark of life is vested in the creator – the franchisor. The franchisee or licensee is a carbon copy of the original. There is nothing wrong with that, it is what it is.

The same is true for business coaches. Many are licensees or accredited agents for a brand or a methodology. Stick within the confines of the cookie cutter system and you are fine. Stray outside the parameters for innovation, reinvention and new paradigms of creative thinking and you are in unchartered waters.

The real thought leadership is with the person who developed the IP. And perhaps that is where the difference in coaching and mentoring fees can be traced.

Here’s three things for you to do today:

1.       Make sure you are learning your lesson. If the lesson doesn’t appear relevant it may be that it’s outside your current paradigm of thinking. It may be relevant but maybe you can’t see how just yet. So ask, “How is this relevant to me?” … and keep on asking.

2.       If there is a circumstance that someone has successfully navigated and it’s a path you want to explore look for a mentor. Circumstances like an economic recession, start-up, merger or acquisition, downsizing, strategic exit, private equity raising, spill of the board, etc.

3.       If you simply want someone to hold you accountable for your actions then choose a coach. It may work just as a personal trainer. A little guidance, some objectivity, fresh eyes and enthusiasm.




 
 
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“Napoleon Hill (October 26, 1883 — November 8, 1970) was an American author in the area of the new thought movement who was one of the earliest producers of the modern genre of personal-success literature. He is widely considered to be one of the great writers on success.

His most famous work. Think and Grow Rich (1937), is one of the best-selling books of all time (at the time of Hill’s death in 1970. Think and Grow Rich had sold 20 million copies). Hill’s works examined the power of personal beliefs, and the role they play in personal success. He became an advisor to President

Franklin D. Roosevelt from 1933 to 1936.

“What the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve’ is one of Hill’s hallmark expressions. How achievement actually occurs, and a formula for it that puts success in reach of the average person. were the focal points of Hills books.”



 
 
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by Christina Sarich
 
You can say its because of a global shift in consciousness, a destiny we have arrived at due to spiritual evolution, or the outcome of strange times, but, many people all across the globe are going through intense personal changes and sensing an expansion of consciousness. Personal changes of this magnitude can be difficult to recognize and to understand, but here are 21 traits of an awakening soul, a ‘sensitive’, or an ‘empath.’

1.  Being in public is overwhelming. Since our walls between self and other are dissolving, we haven’t really learned to distinguish between someone else’s energy and our own. If the general mood of the crowd is herd-like or negative, we can feel this acutely, and may feel like retreating into our own private space. When we have recharged our batteries with meditation, spending time in nature, far away from other people, or just sitting in quiet contemplation, we are ready to be with the masses again. In personal relationships, we often will feel someone else’s emotions as our own. It is important to have this higher sense of empathy, but we must learn to allow another person’s emotions while observing them and keeping our empathy, but, realizing that not all emotions belong to us. Social influence can dampen our own innate wisdom.

2.  We just know certain things. Often called intuitive awareness, we have ‘a-ha’ moments and insights that can explain some of the most complex theories or phenomenon in the world. Some of the most brilliant minds of our time just ‘know.’ Adepts and sages often were given downloads of information from higher states of consciousness after meditating or being in the presence of a more conscious individual; this is happening for more people with more frequency. As we trust our intuition more often, it grows stronger.  This is a time of ‘thinking’ with our hearts more than our heads. Our guts will no longer be ignored. Our dreams are becoming precognitive and eventually our conscious thoughts will be as well.

3.  We find watching main stream media distasteful. The mindset that creates much, but not all, of the programming on television and in cinema is abhorrent. It commodifies people and promotes violence. It reduces our intelligence and numbs our natural empathetic response to someone in pain.

4.  Lying is nearly impossible. We may not know exactly what truth you are withholding, but we can also tell (with our developing intuition and ESP skills) that something isn’t right. We also know when you have other emotions, pain, love, etc. that you aren’t expressing. You’re an open book to us. We aren’t trained in counter-intelligence, we are just observant and knowing. While we may pick up on physical cues, we can look into your eyes and know what you are feeling.

5.  Sympathy pains, whether emotional or physical, are something we experience often. We may pick up symptoms of your cold, just like men who get morning sickness when their wives are pregnant. We tend to absorb emotion through the solar plexus, considered the place we ‘stomach emotion’ so as we learn to strengthen this chakra center, we may sometimes develop digestive issues. Grounding to the earth can help to re-establish our emotional center. Walking barefoot is a great way to re-ground.

6.  We root for the underdog - those without voices, those who have been beaten down by the matrix, etc. We are very compassionate people, and these marginalized individuals often need more love. People can sense our loving hearts, so complete strangers will often tell us their life stories or approach us with their problems. While we don’t want to be a dumping ground for everyone’s issues, we are also a good ear for those working through their stuff.

7.  Energy Vampires are drawn to us like flies, so we need to be extra vigilant in protecting ourselves at times.If we don’t learn how to set proper boundaries, we can get tired easily from taking on other people’s emotions. 

8.  Unfortunately, sensitives or empaths often turn to drug abuse or alcohol to block some of their emotions and to ‘protect’ themselves from feeling the pain of others.

9.  We naturally gravitate towards healing modalities, eg acupuncture, reiki, Qi-Gong, yoga, massage, midwivery, etc. are fields we often find ourselves in. We know that the collective needs to be healed, and so we try our best to offer healing in whatever form we are most drawn to. We also turn away from the ‘traditional’ forms of healing ourselves. Preferring natural foods, herbs, and holistic medicine as ways to cure every ailment.

10.  We see the possibilities before others do. Just like when the church told Copernicus he was wrong, and he stood by his heliocentric theory, we know what the masses refuse to believe. Our minds are light-years ahead.

11.  We are creative. We sing, dance, paint, invent, or write. We have amazing imaginations.

12.  We require solitude - way more than the average person.

13.  We get bored easily, but we are really good at entertaining ourselves.

14.  We have a difficult time doing things we don’t want to do or don’t really enjoy. We really do believe life was meant to be an expression of joy. Why waste it doing something you hate? We aren’t lazy, we are discerning.

15.  We are obsessed with bringing the truth to light. Like little children who say, “that’s not fair” we want to right the wrongs of the world, and we believe it often just takes education. We endeavor to explain the unexplainable and find answers to the deep questions of life. We are seekers, in the Campbellian paradigm. ‘The Hero With a Thousand Faces.”

16.  We can’t keep track of time. Our imaginations often get away with us and a day can feel like a minute, a week, a day.

17.  We abhor routine.

18.  We often disagree with authority (for obvious reasons).

19.  We will often be kind, but if you are egotistical or rude, we won’t spend much time with you or find an excuse to not hang out with people who are obsessed with themselves. We don’t ‘get’ people who are insensitive to other people’s feelings or points of view.

20.  We may be vegan or vegetarian because we can sense a certain energy of the food we eat, like if an animal was slaughtered inhumanely. We don’t want to consume negative energy.

21.  We wear our own emotions on our sleeves and have a hard time ‘pretending’ to be happy if we aren’t. We avoid confrontation, But will quietly go about changing the world in ways you can’t even see.

These 21 traits of an awakening soul are a reminder of how important it is to maintain awareness, clarity and strength in these interesting times. 

adapted from Christina Sarich


 

Spiritual Power

15/06/2014

 
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by Dennis Roberts

However, real spiritual power does not belong to the realm of duality or the dynamics of cause and effect. It is born on the plane of pure being, or beyond, in the uncreated emptiness. It has the capacity to interact with creation without following the laws of creation, without being caught by duality and its shadow dynamics. It is often the lack of any shadow dynamic to this energy that makes it invisible—we perceive things most easily by the shadows they create. Light upon light is more difficult to perceive than light upon darkness.

This spiritual energy that comes from beyond duality, enacted by a master who has been made free from the relative world, can come directly into life without being caught in the play of opposites and its unfolding dramas. It has the capacity to enact the will of the divine in its simple essence. Something just happens. This is what we call a miracle, when there is no logical cause, no pattern of events that appears to cause something. It just is. The divine enters life without the play of opposites, without following the process of creation. This is what makes the intercession of the divine so simple and potent.

LVL (not Luis Vuitton)

 
 
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by Dennis Roberts

In the Renaissance, once again the World Soul was understood to animate and form nature according to divine proportions. And once again the garden of the world was enchanted with magical power and transcendent meaning that was implicit in every part of nature, and the wonderful relationship between the imagination and the creative principle in life flourished. 

It was an extraordinary flowering that really came from the divine feminine within the imagination, and within life, and it was celebrated. Once again the garden of the soul was here in this world. It wasn’t just after you died, in heaven, in paradise; it was here, in the art that the Renaissance masters created. And this is why for some of us, the renaissance touches the soul so deeply now and why there has been a revival of understanding of what happened in the Renaissance. Because it had to do with the divine feminine and the divine feminine within life and that really is an expression of the anima mundi. She once again expressed Herself in the West in that beautiful artistic flowering that touches us so much.

LVL (not Luis Vuitton)

 
 
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by Dennis Roberts

In “The Rise of the Feminine,” we explored how the masculine and feminine polarities, Yin Yang, play out in business and leadership. For hundreds of years business has been dominated by fiercely competitive, command and control, patriarchal models of leadership. Never before have we faced such complexity, rapid change or global challenges. The old patriarchal models of leadership no longer serve.

The Rise of the Feminine” has gathered widespread acceptance in personal and spiritual growth circles but has not been popularised in a business context – until now.

The Rise of the Feminine” has transformed the game of business. And not where you might think. Like a veritable tsunami you won’t see its waves breaking on the shoreline. It is an under-current, such is the way of the feminine. It is covert. Yet powerful beyond measure.

Whilst many look within the corridors of power in board rooms, executive teams of publicly listed companies, and political office, “The Rise of the Feminine” has transformed the micro business landscape right before our very eyes. The take-up rate of home based business, internet marketing, solo-preneurs and freelance work has been phenomenal. These micro enterprises do not rely upon the power and authority structures endemic in large corporations. This is where the economic landscape is being rewritten.

Economic theory was founded on the Law of Scarcity. It underpins everything we know and believe in economics and commerce. In short, competitive market forces of demand and supply determine the equilibrium price where the exchange of goods and services take place.  

It is inaccurate to say the old masculine patriarchal energy has been replaced by “The Rise of the Feminine” in micro business for it never existed in this space. This is how “The Rise of the Feminine” has changed, and is changing, forever the way we do business. The micro business landscape and the world wide web is a portal to a new way of BEING in business.

The Old Boys Club lives on in another guise

Critics of the ‘old boys club’ approach to doing business may well consider that since Adam was a boy we have gathered together in tribes to pursue common goals. I am not an advocate of the Old Boys Club. It is isolationist. There is a better, more inclusive way. Business and leadership are not the sole preserve of men and particularly the old masculine energy based on power and authority structures. Having said that I pose the question:


“Are women’s networks the modern
version of The Old Boys Club?”



The key to long term sustainable change is in the integration of both masculine and feminine energy - “The Rise of the Feminine” coupled with The Rebirth of the Masculine. What we need is not a revolution from patriarch to matriarch but an evolution to new ways of business and leadership. A new model of heart based leadership which integrates BOTH masculine and feminine. This is the essence of Yin Yang – the masculine contains the feminine energy, and the feminine contains the masculine energy. They exist in unity not duality.

The biggest challenge facing women’s groups is how they engage, interact with, and emancipate the old masculine patriarchal energy. There is a wonderful opportunity to lead business into the new age from the heart.

This new age leadership, integrating both feminine and masculine, will come from outside the traditional power and authority structures and most likely will arise covertly from a minority voice. This is leadership. This is true celebration of diversity. The feminine influence on leadership in business will evolve. It will arise from evolution not revolution. This is the way of the feminine. It is not a power play. It is covert, subtle and unassuming.

The decree of quotas may serve to increase the representation of women in positions of power and influence. It’s a nice ideal and an incremental step towards parity. As effective as they might be, quotas aren’t transformative. There is an old adage in selling, “Power buys from power.

“The Rise of the Feminine” is far more than the pursuit of parity. It is far more than an incremental approach. It is of far more benefit than filling 10%-20% of executive positions. The real transformation of leadership is not a power game. There is a fundamental distinction between authority and leadership – everyone can lead and they don’t need to be in positions of power and authority to do so. Moreover, many people in positions of authority don’t lead. Leadership is a verb not a noun.

Micro business is leading the change


I wrote earlier that larger corporations need an authority structure to function. Micro business does not. Because of their small size they provide a perfect opportunity for a more feminine model of leadership.

Talk with any home based business owner and learn how innovative, flexible, collaborative, street smart they are to survive, let alone thrive.

Most micro businesses have a different raison d’etre. They are created more for lifestyle reasons rather than wealth creation. You won’t find them raising private equity, floating on the stock exchange and trading share parcels. These wealth creation strategies of the capital markets shift the game of business.

Micro business has a different agenda. They are more nimble, agile, quicker. If you look at how they operate, why they operate and for whom they operate – it is obvious why there are parallels with the feminine.


by Dennis Roberts


 
 
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by Dennis Roberts

A leader of a small to medium enterprise (SME) has challenges and approaches that differ greatly to a leader of a larger corporation or public enterprise. The term Owner/ Operator illustrates the dual roles that many enterprise leaders play. Not only are there dual roles but there are dual entities – the individual and the enterprise. And these distinctions are important to understand.

The role of the Owner – it is the capital or equity invested in the enterprise that is rewarded. As such the Owner does not need to play an active role in the business. The Owners rewards are twofold – share of the profits (dividends) and/or capital growth (share price). The critical point to note about capital or equity investment is that there is a risk that you will not only get a poor return but that you might lose your entire investment. The corollary of risk is return, ie higher risks command higher returns. That’s the theory in efficient markets but in the small business landscape you investing in your business idea and enterprise might amount to nothing more than buying a ticket in your own lottery. And you need to go in with your eyes open.  

Ask yourself this key question – if I invested my money elsewhere what return on my investment might I have got from alternative investments, say real estate, share market or investment in another business enterprise. 

The role of the Operator – it is the labour effort, generally measured in units of time, that is rewarded. Fee-for-service models are the most common and the rewards you would be familiar with are wages and salaries and perhaps performance incentives, bonuses or commissions.

Ask yourself this key question – if I worked somewhere else what sort of wages and salaries might I earn?

The most common mistake Owner/ Operators make is rewarding their labour effort by withdrawing profits. The reward for labour is wages and salaries whereas the reward for capital/ equity investment is profit (dividends) and/or capital growth. 

If you do this, and many Owner/ Operators do, you will never know the true value of either your labour or your capital. Public accountants fudge the accounts of small businesses to make some sense out of this practice. It is an abhorrent practice.

I say abhorrent because whilst it may provide tax concessions it muddies the waters of both the individual entity and the enterprise entity. They are separate. They are unique and should be treated as such.

How can you become a more effective enterprise leader?

Here I am talking about your role as Operator. In bigger corporations this is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) role. The title is a bit of overkill for a small business don’t you think? Anyway, the challenges most SME Operators face is that they are not only the one in charge but often the only one! SME Operators are required to be hands on and may wear many different hats.

Because you have started the business (as the Owner) you may also find yourself in it up to your ears in the CEO role, sales, marketing, strategy, operations, product development, technology, HR, etc etc.

So here are a few tips on how to become a more effective enterprise leader:

·         Play to your strengths – being in charge means you need to make decisions and the best decision to start with is “I don’t know everything, and I don’t need to know everything.” Do what you love and enjoy. If you run out of juice the whole enterprise will flounder.

·         You must have a handle on core functions – strategy, leadership, sales and finance. Prop yourself up with advisers and top guns but at a minimum know what questions to ask, and how to hold them accountable, ie when you’re being taken for a ride know it and act on it. You are nobody’s patsy.

·         Keep on top of your financials – short cycles, prompt reporting is a discipline worth drilling into your enterprise and how you run it. You should track cashflow weekly; profit monthly; and balance sheet (equity) monthly also. No exceptions.

·         People and performance – learn how to manage people, performance and problems. It is something that can be learned quickly and easily. This is a skill not a behaviour.  You can learn new skills within days.

That should be enough to get you started. If you can distinguish the roles of Owner and Operator and then in turn, your personal success and the success of the enterprise, it will make it so much easier to perform at your best, identify what is working or not, and where and how to take corrective action. Don’t try to do it on your own, engage professional help – you have too much at risk and potentially such much to gain. 


by Dennis Roberts


 
 
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by Dennis Roberts

Amid the confusion of coaching and mentoring there a basic question that might be asked and it is this, “Whose lesson are you learning?” Most clients I come across don’t draw a distinction between the two fields and quite frankly most don’t really care if there is a difference. That said I have been on both the coaching and mentoring panels of one organisation and I’ll share this with you - mentors often get paid more.

The argument put forward by mentoring groups is that you must have a pool of experience, generally senior executive experience, and lots of it. Largely considered the domain of greybeards it is possible the last bastion of the old boys club.  When you engage a mentor the expectation is that you are paying for their experience. And there may be substantial economic value in that aforesaid experience. Now ask the question!

“Whose lesson am I learning?”

The real value of having a mentor is that you learn YOUR lesson. It has nothing to do with you learning the mentor’s lesson unless there is some transfer of knowledge that benefits you. Otherwise you would just as well be served talking with your grandfather.

Mentors can give you a perspective on life’s events that maybe outside your current paradigm of thinking. That is a knowledge transfer. Valuable. 

Mentors can give you lessons and insights into how to navigate your way through a tough situation like a recession. It will only be relevant to the extent that there is something transferable. Learning how tough your grandfather had it during the Great Depression may give insight into his character but may not give you clues as to whether to lay off staff, cut costs or refinance your business.

Coaching v Mentoring

The best description I ever heard of the differences in modalities is that a coach is someone you learn WITH whereas a mentor is someone you learn FROM.

One of the most clichéd examples is of sporting coaches. Many sporting teams still subscribe to the belief that you engage a coach who knows how to play the game. I don’t subscribe to this view. In much the same way a top gun sales person doesn’t necessarily make a good national sales manager, a successful player doesn’t necessarily make a great coach. They are very different skill sets.

The growing popularity of sports science now adds considerable weight to this argument.

Who has the intellectual property?

There is a distinction that needs to be made between a business proprietor and an entrepreneur. At the heart of it an entrepreneur comes up with the big idea and the vision for the business. The much vaunted entrepreneurial spirit is literally the seeding of an idea. From nothing arises something.

A growing number of businesses are franchise business systems. The conception of the idea, the entrepreneurial spirit, the spark of life is vested in the creator – the franchisor. The franchisee or licensee is a carbon copy of the original. There is nothing wrong with that, it is what it is.

The same is true for business coaches. Many are licensees or accredited agents for a brand or a methodology. Stick within the confines of the cookie cutter system and you are fine. Stray outside the parameters for innovation, reinvention and new paradigms of creative thinking and you are in unchartered waters.

The real thought leadership is with the person who developed the IP. And perhaps that is where the difference in coaching and mentoring fees can be traced.

Here’s three things for you to do today:

1.       Make sure you are learning your lesson. If the lesson doesn’t appear relevant it may be that it’s outside your current paradigm of thinking. It may be relevant but maybe you can’t see how just yet. So ask, “How is this relevant to me?” … and keep on asking.

2.       If there is a circumstance that someone has successfully navigated and it’s a path you want to explore look for a mentor. Circumstances like an economic recession, start-up, merger or acquisition, downsizing, strategic exit, private equity raising, spill of the board, etc.

3.       If you simply want someone to hold you accountable for your actions then choose a coach. It may work just as a personal trainer. A little guidance, some objectivity, fresh eyes and enthusiasm. 


by Dennis Roberts